Scipsy

The three virus capsid classes [img: Periodic Table of Virus Capsids: Implications for Natural Selection and Design]

Icosahedral capsid (protein shell that envelops the DNA) of Herpes simples virus 1 (HSV-1). [img 1/2)

The Deadly Genomes - Genome Size and Structure of Harmful Bacteria and Viruses
Complete Poster.
Herpes simplex virus (via siumed.edu)

Herpes simplex virus (via siumed.edu)

Wasp Virus. The Australian wasp Microplitus demolitor makes a virus that is required for successful parasitization and egg survival. (via biochem.wisc.edu)

Wasp Virus. The Australian wasp Microplitus demolitor makes a virus that is required for successful parasitization and egg survival. (via biochem.wisc.edu)

Structure of HIV
Virus in Three Dimensions

To help scientists understand how the Penicillium stoloniferum virus interacts with its hosts, replicates, and matures over its life cycle, the virus structure was solved at the very high resolution of 7.3 Angstroms in NSF-supported research. Running the automated AUTO3DEM software on an SDSC supercomputer, the full 3-D virus was reconstructed, starting with 2-D cryo-electron microscopy images. The software was developed by UC San Diego structural biologists Tim Baker and Xiaodong Yan with SDSC computational scientist Robert Sinkovits. (via sdsc.edu)

Virus in Three Dimensions

To help scientists understand how the Penicillium stoloniferum virus interacts with its hosts, replicates, and matures over its life cycle, the virus structure was solved at the very high resolution of 7.3 Angstroms in NSF-supported research. Running the automated AUTO3DEM software on an SDSC supercomputer, the full 3-D virus was reconstructed, starting with 2-D cryo-electron microscopy images. The software was developed by UC San Diego structural biologists Tim Baker and Xiaodong Yan with SDSC computational scientist Robert Sinkovits. (via sdsc.edu)

Brief window for foot and mouth transmission
To help scientists understand how the Penicillium stoloniferum virus interacts with its hosts, replicates, and matures over its life cycle, the virus structure was solved at the very high resolution of 7.3 Angstroms in National Science Foundation-supported research. Running the automated AUTO3DEM software on a San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) supercomputer, the full 3-D virus was reconstructed, starting with 2-D cryo-electron microscopy images. The software was developed by University of California, San Diego (UCSD), structural biologists Tim Baker and Xiaodong Yan with SDSC computational scientist Robert Sinkovits. (via Virus In Three Dimensions)

To help scientists understand how the Penicillium stoloniferum virus interacts with its hosts, replicates, and matures over its life cycle, the virus structure was solved at the very high resolution of 7.3 Angstroms in National Science Foundation-supported research. Running the automated AUTO3DEM software on a San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) supercomputer, the full 3-D virus was reconstructed, starting with 2-D cryo-electron microscopy images. The software was developed by University of California, San Diego (UCSD), structural biologists Tim Baker and Xiaodong Yan with SDSC computational scientist Robert Sinkovits. (via Virus In Three Dimensions)