Scipsy

Have you ever wondered how space exploration impacts your daily life? [Interactive]
While you’re up, print me a solar cell

New MIT-developed materials make it possible to produce photovoltaic cells on paper or fabric, nearly as simply as printing a document. […]

While you’re up, print me a solar cell

New MIT-developed materials make it possible to produce photovoltaic cells on paper or fabric, nearly as simply as printing a document. […]

NASA Light Technology Successfully Reduces Cancer Patients Painful Side Effects from Radiation and Chemotherapy

A NASA technology originally developed for plant growth experiments on  space shuttle missions has successfully reduced the painful side effects  resulting from chemotherapy and radiation treatment in bone marrow and  stem cell transplant patients.   In a two-year clinical trial, cancer patients undergoing bone marrow or  stem cell transplants were given a far red/near infrared Light Emitting  Diode treatment called High Emissivity Aluminiferous Luminescent  Substrate, or HEALS, to treat oral mucositis — a common and extremely  painful side effect of chemotherapy and radiation treatment. The trial  concluded that there is a 96 percent chance that the improvement in pain  of those in the high-risk patient group was the result of the HEALS  treatment.   “Using this technology as a healing agent was phenomenal,” said Dr.  Donna Salzman, clinical trial principal investigator and director of  clinical services and education at the Bone Marrow Transplant and  Cellular Therapy Unit at the University of Alabama at Birmingham  Hospital. “The HEALS device was well tolerated with no adverse affects  to our bone marrow and stem cell transplant patients.” […]

NASA Light Technology Successfully Reduces Cancer Patients Painful Side Effects from Radiation and Chemotherapy

A NASA technology originally developed for plant growth experiments on space shuttle missions has successfully reduced the painful side effects resulting from chemotherapy and radiation treatment in bone marrow and stem cell transplant patients.

In a two-year clinical trial, cancer patients undergoing bone marrow or stem cell transplants were given a far red/near infrared Light Emitting Diode treatment called High Emissivity Aluminiferous Luminescent Substrate, or HEALS, to treat oral mucositis — a common and extremely painful side effect of chemotherapy and radiation treatment. The trial concluded that there is a 96 percent chance that the improvement in pain of those in the high-risk patient group was the result of the HEALS treatment.

“Using this technology as a healing agent was phenomenal,” said Dr. Donna Salzman, clinical trial principal investigator and director of clinical services and education at the Bone Marrow Transplant and Cellular Therapy Unit at the University of Alabama at Birmingham Hospital. “The HEALS device was well tolerated with no adverse affects to our bone marrow and stem cell transplant patients.” […]

FILE São Paulo 2008 (by Fernanda Landa)

exploitsinliving:

coolest prosthetic arm ever


Mh…
From the description: 

For this project we were pushed by our Professor to push the boundaries of current upper-limb prosthetic design.Through extensive research I found that the prosthetic functioned as an assistant to the dominant functioning hand. The prosthetic needed to be both flexible and adjustable in order to accommodate a variety of different grips.

Mh, yeh, it’s a great idea, but what about anthropomorphism? I think (but I’m not actually an expert), for people who need a prosthesis is important that it is flexible and adjustable, but also humanlike. This is good, but seems to be a little too sci-fi, it seems like a tentacle. Am I wrong?

exploitsinliving:

coolest prosthetic arm ever

Mh…

From the description: 

For this project we were pushed by our Professor to push the boundaries of current upper-limb prosthetic design.

Through extensive research I found that the prosthetic functioned as an assistant to the dominant functioning hand. The prosthetic needed to be both flexible and adjustable in order to accommodate a variety of different grips.

Mh, yeh, it’s a great idea, but what about anthropomorphism? I think (but I’m not actually an expert), for people who need a prosthesis is important that it is flexible and adjustable, but also humanlike. This is good, but seems to be a little too sci-fi, it seems like a tentacle. Am I wrong?

(Source: glitterhag)

Brass (by David Morgan-Mar)
The Museum of the History of Science, Oxford University, Oxford.

Brass (by David Morgan-Mar)

The Museum of the History of Science, Oxford University, Oxford.