Scipsy

Photomicrograph of a section of gabbro (via Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia)

Gabbro refers to a large group of dark, coarse-grained, intrusive mafic igneous rocks chemically equivalent to basalt. The rocks are plutonic, formed when molten magma is trapped beneath the Earth’s surface and cools into a crystalline mass. (via W.)

Photomicrograph of a section of gabbro (via Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia)

Gabbro refers to a large group of dark, coarse-grained, intrusive mafic igneous rocks chemically equivalent to basalt. The rocks are plutonic, formed when molten magma is trapped beneath the Earth’s surface and cools into a crystalline mass. (via W.)

Rhodolith (by Schwarzrinder)
Valley of Fire Geology (by Dave Toussaint)
DSC00864 (by railroadweasel)
Alien Formations (by Property#1)
Hopewell Rocks
At   low tide, explore quiet coves with flowerpot-shaped  rock formations  bearing such curious names as ‘Mother-in-Law’, ‘ET’ and ‘Lover’s Arch’.  Then, as the tide gently shifts, experience the wonder of nature as  100-billion tonnes of salt-water slowly fills the Bay of Fundy.
These are the highest tides in the world. And they happen twice a day….every day.
At  high tide, paddle a kayak around these same sandstone pillars or visit  our multi-media interpretive centre where you will learn about the  fascinating geology and forces that crafted them. Discover the colourful  Mi’kmaq legends created to explain this unique phenomenon of these  extraordinary tides.
And that’s not all…in late July and early  August, witness the awe-inspiring aerial dance performed by thousands of  migrating shorebirds.
The Hopewell Rocks is a place to pause…a  place to appreciate a remarkable story interwoven through time, tide,  and the intricacies of nature.

Alien Formations (by Property#1)

Hopewell Rocks

At low tide, explore quiet coves with flowerpot-shaped rock formations bearing such curious names as ‘Mother-in-Law’, ‘ET’ and ‘Lover’s Arch’. Then, as the tide gently shifts, experience the wonder of nature as 100-billion tonnes of salt-water slowly fills the Bay of Fundy.

These are the highest tides in the world. And they happen twice a day….every day.

At high tide, paddle a kayak around these same sandstone pillars or visit our multi-media interpretive centre where you will learn about the fascinating geology and forces that crafted them. Discover the colourful Mi’kmaq legends created to explain this unique phenomenon of these extraordinary tides.

And that’s not all…in late July and early August, witness the awe-inspiring aerial dance performed by thousands of migrating shorebirds.

The Hopewell Rocks is a place to pause…a place to appreciate a remarkable story interwoven through time, tide, and the intricacies of nature.