Scipsy

I didn’t accidentally land at the Bronx High School of Science, I knew I wanted to become an astrophysicist not because I chose it, in a way, the universe chose me that first day in the Hayden Planetarium at age nine as a kid. And I looked up, and the lights dimmed and the stars came out and I was called by the universe. I had no choice in the matter and became a student of the university with the ambition of one day being one of the participants in research on the frontier of cosmic discovery.

Called by the Universe: Neil deGrasse Tyson

He adds:

The universe called me. My uncle didn’t call me, nobody else called me, the universe called me.


Let me clarify this notion that science is the path to solving your problems. I think that misrepresents what drives scientists. Do you think when you speak with Brian Greene he’s going to say “I am trying to come up with a coherent understanding of the nature of reality so that I can solve people’s problems”? Do you think that’s what’s driving him? Do you think I’m being driven when I look at the early universe or study the rotation of galaxies or the consumption of matter by black holes, do you think I’m being driven by the lessening of the suffering of the people on Earth? Most research on the frontier of science is not driven by that goal. Period. Now, that being said, most of the greatest applications of science that do improve the human condition comes from just that kind of research. Therein is the intellectual link that needs to be established in an elective democracy where tax-based monies pay for the research on the frontier. Because people are saying “why are you researching that when you should be finding a cure for my disease?”. Okay, and I don’t have a problem with that. But did you know that we diagnosed your disease using an MRI? And what is the physical principle behind the magnetic resonance imager? It came from a physicist who’s an expert in atomic nuclei wondering how you would detect this…in interstellar space! Do you think that physicist, when he came up with this understanding of — it’s called nuclear magnetic resonance — do you think he was saying to himself “one day we’ll have machines that will diagnose the condition of the human body without cutting it open in advance”? Do you think this is what was going on in his head? Of course not! It came out of this curiosity-driven research. Do you think Einstein, when he wrote down his equations for stimulated emission of atoms, (that) he’s saying to himself, “hey, one day this will be the foundation of a laser and we’ll have bar coding”? Do you think this is on his — “one day we’ll have LASIK surgery”! No! No! So, to say that “the purpose of science is to improve life” — the purpose of science is to understand the natural world. And the natural world has, interestingly enough, built within it, forces and phenomena and materials that a whole other round of clever people — engineers, in the case of the magnetic resonance imager, these are biomedical engineers basing their patents, their machine principles on physics, discovered by a physicist, an astrophysicist at that. So I take issue with the assumption that science is simply to make life better. Science is to understand the world. And use that — now you’ve got a utility belt of understanding. Now you access your tools out of that, and use those, an ever-increasing assortment of power over nature, to use that power in the greater good of our species. You need it all.
Neil deGrasse Tyson on the “science should be used to improve life” argument

Magnetic Fields revealed - recorded at NASA (via pg3ffect)

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The secret lives of invisible magnetic fields are revealed as chaotic ever-changing geometries . All action takes place around NASA’s Space Sciences Laboratories, UC Berkeley, to recordings of space scientists describing their discoveries . Actual VLF audio recordings control the evolution of the fields as they delve into our inaudible surroundings, revealing recurrent ‘whistlers’ produced by fleeting electrons . Are we observing a series of scientific experiments, the universe in flux, or a documentary of a fictional world? 

More info here semiconductorfilms.com/​root/​Magnetic_Movie/​Magnetic.htm

Electric cable at CERN—Christian Stephani (by InterAction Collaboration)
his image placed third in CERN’s local competition. The photograph shows an electric cable connected to a valve that is designed to avoid pressure damage in a magnet.

Electric cable at CERN—Christian Stephani (by InterAction Collaboration)

his image placed third in CERN’s local competition. The photograph shows an electric cable connected to a valve that is designed to avoid pressure damage in a magnet.

Paperclips atop the world’s largest cyclotron (by InterAction Collaboration)

This image won first place in TRIUMF’s local competition. Atop the world’s largest cyclotron at TRIUMF, paperclips experience some fringe magnetic field and stand upright, dancing atop the table’s surface. High-school student Ali Lambert artfully captured this iconic experience of all visitors to TRIUMF.

Paperclips atop the world’s largest cyclotron (by InterAction Collaboration)

This image won first place in TRIUMF’s local competition. Atop the world’s largest cyclotron at TRIUMF, paperclips experience some fringe magnetic field and stand upright, dancing atop the table’s surface. High-school student Ali Lambert artfully captured this iconic experience of all visitors to TRIUMF.