Scipsy

BrainNetworks_golgi_cells (by Texas A&M University Research and Graduate Studies)
Andrew Carnie (UK) - Magic Forest, 2002 (by Ed Jansen)
Corey Seehus, Brain Cells Inc, USA (by GE Healthcare)
This image represents human neural stem cells from fetal cortex. Cells are stained for nuclear (Hoechst, blue), neuronal (TUJ-1, red), and neural progenitor (Nestin, green) markers. Images are acquired using the InCell Analyzer 1000™. The images taken from this assay are analyzed using the Developer Toolbox™ software.This image is one of many taken from BCI’s growing platform of human neural stem cell differentiation assays. BCI uses this assay along with several others in its neurogenesis platform to identify clinical-stage compounds, novel targets and compounds optimal for CNS indications.

Corey Seehus, Brain Cells Inc, USA (by GE Healthcare)

This image represents human neural stem cells from fetal cortex. Cells are stained for nuclear (Hoechst, blue), neuronal (TUJ-1, red), and neural progenitor (Nestin, green) markers. Images are acquired using the InCell Analyzer 1000™. The images taken from this assay are analyzed using the Developer Toolbox™ software.
This image is one of many taken from BCI’s growing platform of human neural stem cell differentiation assays. BCI uses this assay along with several others in its neurogenesis platform to identify clinical-stage compounds, novel targets and compounds optimal for CNS indications.

Asha Bhakar, MIT in collaboration with the Harvard LDDN, USA (by GE Healthcare)
Developing primary hippocampal neurons labeled with the dendritic marker MAP2 (green), the nuclear dye Hoeschst (blue), and the axonal protein Synapsin I (red) were imaged on the IN Cell 1000 using a 20X objective and the IN Cell Analyzer software

Asha Bhakar, MIT in collaboration with the Harvard LDDN, USA (by GE Healthcare)

Developing primary hippocampal neurons labeled with the dendritic marker MAP2 (green), the nuclear dye Hoeschst (blue), and the axonal protein Synapsin I (red) were imaged on the IN Cell 1000 using a 20X objective and the IN Cell Analyzer software

Alejandro Dearie, Brain Cells Inc., USA (by GE Healthcare)
This image represents a section of a rat hippocampal tissue mounted on a glass coverslide. Cells are stained for neuronal (NeuN, red) markers. Images are acquired using the InCell Analyzer 1000™. Images are tiled using a Pipeline Pilot™ protocol designed specifically for this purpose. This is a representative image from BCI’s cutting edge ex-vivo platform. BCI uses this assay along with several other in vivo behavioral assays in its neurogenesis platform to identify clinical-stage compounds, novel targets and compounds optimal for CNS indications. 

Alejandro Dearie, Brain Cells Inc., USA (by GE Healthcare)

This image represents a section of a rat hippocampal tissue mounted on a glass coverslide. Cells are stained for neuronal (NeuN, red) markers. Images are acquired using the InCell Analyzer 1000™. Images are tiled using a Pipeline Pilot™ protocol designed specifically for this purpose. 
This is a representative image from BCI’s cutting edge ex-vivo platform. BCI uses this assay along with several other in vivo behavioral assays in its neurogenesis platform to identify clinical-stage compounds, novel targets and compounds optimal for CNS indications. 

Corey Seehus, Brain Cells Inc, USA (by GE Healthcare)
This image represents human neural stem cells from fetal cortex. Cells are stained for nuclear (Hoechst, blue), neuronal (TUJ-1, green), and astrocyte (GFAP, red) markers. Images are acquired using the InCell Analyzer 1000™. The images taken from this assay are analyzed using the Developer Toolbox™ software.This image is one of many taken from BCI’s growing platform of human neural stem cell differentiation assays. BCI uses this assay along with several others in its neurogenesis platform to identify clinical-stage compounds, novel targets and compounds optimal for CNS indications.

Corey Seehus, Brain Cells Inc, USA (by GE Healthcare)

This image represents human neural stem cells from fetal cortex. Cells are stained for nuclear (Hoechst, blue), neuronal (TUJ-1, green), and astrocyte (GFAP, red) markers. Images are acquired using the InCell Analyzer 1000™. The images taken from this assay are analyzed using the Developer Toolbox™ software.
This image is one of many taken from BCI’s growing platform of human neural stem cell differentiation assays. BCI uses this assay along with several others in its neurogenesis platform to identify clinical-stage compounds, novel targets and compounds optimal for CNS indications.

Alejandro Dearie, Brain Cells Inc, USA (by GE Healthcare)
This image represents a section of a rat hippocampal tissue mounted on a glass coverslide. Cells are stained for neuronal (NeuN, red) and proliferation markers (BrdU, green; Ki67 blue). Images are acquired using the InCell Analyzer 1000™. This is a representative image from BCI’s cutting edge ex-vivo platform. BCI uses this assay along with several other in vivo behavioral assays in its neurogenesis platform to identify clinical-stage compounds, novel targets and compounds optimal for CNS indications.

Alejandro Dearie, Brain Cells Inc, USA (by GE Healthcare)

This image represents a section of a rat hippocampal tissue mounted on a glass coverslide. Cells are stained for neuronal (NeuN, red) and proliferation markers (BrdU, green; Ki67 blue). Images are acquired using the InCell Analyzer 1000™. This is a representative image from BCI’s cutting edge ex-vivo platform. BCI uses this assay along with several other in vivo behavioral assays in its neurogenesis platform to identify clinical-stage compounds, novel targets and compounds optimal for CNS indications.