Scipsy

Full Earth when viewed from the Moon shines about 50x brighter than the full Moon viewed from Earth.
@Neil deGrasse Tyson

Small crater within Aitken crater. It has a terraced and hummocky floor, with boulders strewn about, and no bright rays. NAC image M145855135RE, image width is 700 m (via Terraced Craters in Aitken Crater - LROC News System)

Small crater within Aitken crater. It has a terraced and hummocky floor, with boulders strewn about, and no bright rays. NAC image M145855135RE, image width is 700 m (via Terraced Craters in Aitken Crater - LROC News System)

Moon: Clementine Mission Global Mosaic 
This is a global mosaic image of the Moon as seen by the near-infrared sensors on the Clementine spacecraft. (via USGS Astrogeology: Image Gallery)

Moon: Clementine Mission Global Mosaic

This is a global mosaic image of the Moon as seen by the near-infrared sensors on the Clementine spacecraft. (via USGS Astrogeology: Image Gallery)

The Moon follows us… (by Paolo Nespoli)

1. We’ve been there. No, really. Six times.

2. It’s getting farther away. 3.82 ± 0.07 centimeters each year. We can measure it using lasers beamed from Earth to mirrors left by the Apollo astronauts (see point 1). This means Earth’s days are getting longer … by a second or so every century.

3. Meteorites from Earth’s early days might be found there. If you happen to like rocks, this is cool because Earth doesn’t have its earliest rocks; we recycle and erode our crust.

4. The Moon does not protect Earth from asteroids. It’s tiny and it’s far away. Time to invest in a different strategy.

5. Space-faring civilizations do not have outposts there. How do we know? Because space-faring civilizations would be bright enough to pick some more pleasant place to dwell … like Earth. Ask your best friend if he/she is from another space-faring civilization … and sleep well tonight.

6. It has gravity. Don’t believe everything you see on television; believe Newton instead. Anything with mass has gravity.

7. The Moon does not make its own light. Do you see a pull cord or switch? It, like all planetary bodies, including Earth, reflect sunlight.

8. There IS NO DARK SIDE, Pink Floyd. The Moon spins on its axis just like Earth does; we just happen to see the same side all the time because it spins at the same rate it orbits Earth.

9. We recently confirmed there is water on the Moon, probably carried there by comets (not by space-faring civilizations).

10. The Moon is NOT made of cheese; where did that idea come from? It’s made of rocky stuff. Pretty much the same types of materials as Earth.

↳ Top 10 things informed memberd of society should know about the Moon. (via MyMoon) (Also, do their quiz!)

L4 - Montes Apenninus (by John Talbot)

Montes Apenninus are a rugged mountain range on the northern part of the Moon’s near side. They are named after the Apennine Mountains in Italy.
Best 200 of 500 frames captured with DMK camera on 200mm f/4 Newtonian telescope.

L4 - Montes Apenninus (by John Talbot)

Montes Apenninus are a rugged mountain range on the northern part of the Moon’s near side. They are named after the Apennine Mountains in Italy.

Best 200 of 500 frames captured with DMK camera on 200mm f/4 Newtonian telescope.


Moonrise through the atmosphere (shot from the ISS by Paolo Nespoli) (via rispostesenzadomanda)

Moonrise through the atmosphere (shot from the ISS by Paolo Nespoli) (via rispostesenzadomanda)

 Aerial View of Apollo 11 Saturn V on Transporter
The Transporter nears the top of the five percent incline at Launch Complex 39A with the Apollo 11 Saturn V.

 Aerial View of Apollo 11 Saturn V on Transporter

The Transporter nears the top of the five percent incline at Launch Complex 39A with the Apollo 11 Saturn V.

 Schmitt Covered with Lunar Dirt
Geologist-Astronaut Harrison Schmitt, Apollo 17 lunar module pilot, uses an adjustable sampling scoop to retrieve lunar samples during the second extravehicular activity (EVA-2), at Station 5 at the Taurus- Littrow landing site. The cohesive nature of the lunar soil is born out by the “dirty” appearance of Schmitt’s space suit. A gnomon is atop the large rock in the foreground. The gnomon is a stadia rod mounted on a tripod, and serves as an indicator of the gravitational vector and provides accurate vertical reference and calibrated length for determining size and position of objects in near-field photographs. The color scale of blue, orange and green is used to accurately determine color for photography. The rod of it is 18 inches long. The scoop Dr. Schmitt is using is 11 3/4 inches long and is attached to a tool extension which adds a potential 30 inches of length to the scoop. The pan portion, blocked in this view, has a flat bottom, flanged on both sides with a partial cover on the top. It is used to retrieve sand, dust and lunar samples too small for the tongs. The pan and the adjusting mechanism are made of stainless steel and the handle is made of aluminum.

Schmitt Covered with Lunar Dirt

Geologist-Astronaut Harrison Schmitt, Apollo 17 lunar module pilot, uses an adjustable sampling scoop to retrieve lunar samples during the second extravehicular activity (EVA-2), at Station 5 at the Taurus- Littrow landing site. The cohesive nature of the lunar soil is born out by the “dirty” appearance of Schmitt’s space suit. A gnomon is atop the large rock in the foreground. The gnomon is a stadia rod mounted on a tripod, and serves as an indicator of the gravitational vector and provides accurate vertical reference and calibrated length for determining size and position of objects in near-field photographs. The color scale of blue, orange and green is used to accurately determine color for photography. The rod of it is 18 inches long. The scoop Dr. Schmitt is using is 11 3/4 inches long and is attached to a tool extension which adds a potential 30 inches of length to the scoop. The pan portion, blocked in this view, has a flat bottom, flanged on both sides with a partial cover on the top. It is used to retrieve sand, dust and lunar samples too small for the tongs. The pan and the adjusting mechanism are made of stainless steel and the handle is made of aluminum.

 Global Image of Io
NASA’s Galileo spacecraft acquired its highest resolution images of Jupiter’s moon Io on July 3, 1999 during its closest pass to Io since orbit insertion in late 1995. This color mosaic uses the near-infrared, green and violet filters (slightly more than the visible range) of the spacecraft’s camera and approximates what the human eye would see. Most of Io’s surface has pastel colors, punctuated by black, brown, green, orange, and red units near the active volcanic centers. A false color version of the mosaic has been created to enhance the contrast of the color variations. The improved resolution reveals small-scale color units which had not been recognized previously and which suggest that the lavas and sulfurous deposits are composed of complex mixtures. Some of the bright (whitish), high-latitude (near the top and bottom) deposits have an ethereal quality like a transparent covering of frost. Bright red areas were seen previously only as diffuse deposits. However, they are now seen to exist as both diffuse deposits and sharp linear features like fissures. Some volcanic centers have bright and colorful flows, perhaps due to flows of sulfur rather than silicate lava. In this region bright, white material can also be seen to emanate from linear rifts and cliffs. Comparison of this image to previous Galileo images reveals many changes due to the ongoing volcanic activity. North is towards the top of the picture and the sun illuminates the surface from almost directly behind the spacecraft. This illumination geometry is good for imaging color variations, but poor for imaging topographic shading. However, some topographic shading can be seen here due to the combination of relatively high resolution (1.3 kilometers or 0.8 miles per picture element) and the rugged topography over parts of Io. The image is centered at 0.3 degrees north latitude and 137.5 degrees west longitude. The resolution is 1.3 kilometers (0.8 miles) per picture element. The images were taken on July 3, 1999 at a range of about 130,000 kilometers (81,000 miles) by the Solid State Imaging (SSI) system on NASA’s Galileo spacecraft during its twenty-first orbit. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California manages the Galileo mission for NASA’s Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

 Global Image of Io

NASA’s Galileo spacecraft acquired its highest resolution images of Jupiter’s moon Io on July 3, 1999 during its closest pass to Io since orbit insertion in late 1995. This color mosaic uses the near-infrared, green and violet filters (slightly more than the visible range) of the spacecraft’s camera and approximates what the human eye would see. Most of Io’s surface has pastel colors, punctuated by black, brown, green, orange, and red units near the active volcanic centers. A false color version of the mosaic has been created to enhance the contrast of the color variations. The improved resolution reveals small-scale color units which had not been recognized previously and which suggest that the lavas and sulfurous deposits are composed of complex mixtures. Some of the bright (whitish), high-latitude (near the top and bottom) deposits have an ethereal quality like a transparent covering of frost. Bright red areas were seen previously only as diffuse deposits. However, they are now seen to exist as both diffuse deposits and sharp linear features like fissures. Some volcanic centers have bright and colorful flows, perhaps due to flows of sulfur rather than silicate lava. In this region bright, white material can also be seen to emanate from linear rifts and cliffs. Comparison of this image to previous Galileo images reveals many changes due to the ongoing volcanic activity. North is towards the top of the picture and the sun illuminates the surface from almost directly behind the spacecraft. This illumination geometry is good for imaging color variations, but poor for imaging topographic shading. However, some topographic shading can be seen here due to the combination of relatively high resolution (1.3 kilometers or 0.8 miles per picture element) and the rugged topography over parts of Io. The image is centered at 0.3 degrees north latitude and 137.5 degrees west longitude. The resolution is 1.3 kilometers (0.8 miles) per picture element. The images were taken on July 3, 1999 at a range of about 130,000 kilometers (81,000 miles) by the Solid State Imaging (SSI) system on NASA’s Galileo spacecraft during its twenty-first orbit. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California manages the Galileo mission for NASA’s Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.