Scipsy

Sunset #3 (by Paolo Nespoli)
View through Earth’s atmosphere from the ISS (by European Space Agency)
Looking through Earth’s atmosphere and across cloud tops, this image was taken by ESA astronaut Thomas Reiter (DE) during his five-month stay on the International Space Station in 2006.

View through Earth’s atmosphere from the ISS (by European Space Agency)

Looking through Earth’s atmosphere and across cloud tops, this image was taken by ESA astronaut Thomas Reiter (DE) during his five-month stay on the International Space Station in 2006.

Astana, Kazakhstan (by Paolo Nespoli)
Which crater? (by Paolo Nespoli+ Add Contact)
(P36) Which crater? Used in 1960s as a training site for Apollo astonaut

Which crater? (by Paolo Nespoli+ Add Contact)

(P36) Which crater? Used in 1960s as a training site for Apollo astonaut

St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands (by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center+ Add Contact)
Sunset #3 (by Paolo Nespoli+ Add Contact)
03. Earth (by Ross Berens)
Earth Pt. 2 of Science Series (by briana and jason)
Earth Aurora (Auroral X-ray emission observed from Earth’s north polar region.) (by Smithsonian Institution)
The bright arcs in this Chandra image show low-energy X-rays (0.1 - 10 kilo electron volts) generated during auroral activity. The image - seen here superimposed on a simulated image of Earth - is from an approximately 20-minute scan during which Chandra was pointed at a fixed point in the sky while the Earth’s motion carried the auroral region through the field of view. Auroras are produced by solar storms that disturb Earth’s magnetic field and accelerate electrons which speed along the magnetic field into the polar regions. There the electrons collide with atoms high in Earth’s atmosphere and emit X-rays.

Earth Aurora (Auroral X-ray emission observed from Earth’s north polar region.) (by Smithsonian Institution)

The bright arcs in this Chandra image show low-energy X-rays (0.1 - 10 kilo electron volts) generated during auroral activity. The image - seen here superimposed on a simulated image of Earth - is from an approximately 20-minute scan during which Chandra was pointed at a fixed point in the sky while the Earth’s motion carried the auroral region through the field of view. Auroras are produced by solar storms that disturb Earth’s magnetic field and accelerate electrons which speed along the magnetic field into the polar regions. There the electrons collide with atoms high in Earth’s atmosphere and emit X-rays.