Scipsy

Zond-8 Earthset, October 24, 1970. 

Zond-8 flew by the Moon and returned to Earth with high quality photographs, some from as close as 1,350 km. Images were shot with the 400 mm AFA-BAM camera, on 13 by 18-centimeter frames of isopanchromatic film. A session of 20 full-Moon pictures was followed by a session of 78 lunar-surface pictures (including 17 shots of Earth over the lunar horizon). (via The Planetary Society)

Zond-8 Earthset, October 24, 1970.

Zond-8 flew by the Moon and returned to Earth with high quality photographs, some from as close as 1,350 km. Images were shot with the 400 mm AFA-BAM camera, on 13 by 18-centimeter frames of isopanchromatic film. A session of 20 full-Moon pictures was followed by a session of 78 lunar-surface pictures (including 17 shots of Earth over the lunar horizon). (via The Planetary Society)

Eclipsed Earth, 1999
Meteor Crater is one of the youngest and best-preserved impact craters on Earth. The crater formed roughly 50,000 years ago when a 30-meter-wide, iron-rich meteor weighing 100,000 tons struck the Arizona desert at an estimated 20 kilometers per second. The resulting explosion exceeded the combined force of today’s nuclear arsenals and created a 1.1-kilometer-wide, 200-meter-deep crater.

Meteor Crater is one of the youngest and best-preserved impact craters on Earth. The crater formed roughly 50,000 years ago when a 30-meter-wide, iron-rich meteor weighing 100,000 tons struck the Arizona desert at an estimated 20 kilometers per second. The resulting explosion exceeded the combined force of today’s nuclear arsenals and created a 1.1-kilometer-wide, 200-meter-deep crater.

Ocean Sand, Bahamas

Though the above image may resemble a new age painting straight out of an art gallery in Venice Beach, California, it is in fact a satellite image of the sands and seaweed in the Bahamas. The image was taken by the Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM ) instrument aboard the Landsat 7 satellite. Tides and ocean currents in the Bahamas sculpted the sand and seaweed beds into these multicolored, fluted patterns in much the same way that winds sculpted the vast sand dunes in the Sahara Desert. (via Earth As Art)

Ocean Sand, Bahamas

Though the above image may resemble a new age painting straight out of an art gallery in Venice Beach, California, it is in fact a satellite image of the sands and seaweed in the Bahamas. The image was taken by the Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM ) instrument aboard the Landsat 7 satellite. Tides and ocean currents in the Bahamas sculpted the sand and seaweed beds into these multicolored, fluted patterns in much the same way that winds sculpted the vast sand dunes in the Sahara Desert. (via Earth As Art)

Madagascar jellyfish
The Earth and the moon seen from space. (via CSA)

The Earth and the moon seen from space. (via CSA)

A sunrise and the first glimmer of daylight peek above the Earth’s horizon. (via CSA)

A sunrise and the first glimmer of daylight peek above the Earth’s horizon. (via CSA)

The International Space Station and the Docked Space Shuttle Endeavour (via NASA)

The International Space Station and the Docked Space Shuttle Endeavour (via NASA)

Sunset Изображение 43 из 105 (via Russian Federal Space Agency)

Sunset Изображение 43 из 105 (via Russian Federal Space Agency)


The Arabian Peninsula’s Empty Quarter, known as Rub’ al Khali, is the world’s largest sand sea, holding about half as much sand as the Sahara Desert. The Empty Quarter covers 583,000 square kilometers (225,000 square miles), and stretches over parts of Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Oman, and the United Arab Emirates. The Enhanced Thematic Mapper on NASA’s Landsat 7 satellite captured this image of the Empty Quarter on August 26, 2001. The area shown resides in southeastern Saudi Arabia, midway between the United Arab Emirates to the north and Oman in the south. Parallel rows of salmon-pink and white alternate to create a rippling pattern. White salt flats, known as sebkhas or sabkhas, separate the dunes. These salt-encrusted plains vary in hardness, in some places creating a surface strong enough to drive a vehicle over, in other places disappearing into sand. The sand dunes soar above the salt plains between them (via Empty Quarter)

The Arabian Peninsula’s Empty Quarter, known as Rub’ al Khali, is the world’s largest sand sea, holding about half as much sand as the Sahara Desert. The Empty Quarter covers 583,000 square kilometers (225,000 square miles), and stretches over parts of Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Oman, and the United Arab Emirates. The Enhanced Thematic Mapper on NASA’s Landsat 7 satellite captured this image of the Empty Quarter on August 26, 2001. The area shown resides in southeastern Saudi Arabia, midway between the United Arab Emirates to the north and Oman in the south. Parallel rows of salmon-pink and white alternate to create a rippling pattern. White salt flats, known as sebkhas or sabkhas, separate the dunes. These salt-encrusted plains vary in hardness, in some places creating a surface strong enough to drive a vehicle over, in other places disappearing into sand. The sand dunes soar above the salt plains between them (via Empty Quarter)