Scipsy

Central Pyrenees (NASA, ASTER, Terra, 08/01/00) (by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center)
The Alps may be more famous, but the Pyrenees have been around much  longer: tens of millions of years longer, in fact. These mountains  formed between 100 and 150 million years ago when the landmass that  Spain occupies pushed into the one that France occupies. The mountains  have served as a natural barrier between the Iberian Peninsula (Spain  and Portugal) and the rest of Europe ever since. Stretching east to west  across 430 square kilometers (267 miles), the Pyrenees fall mostly  within Spain’s borders, but also pass into the independent state of  Andorra.
The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection  Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA’s Terra satellite captured this image of part  of the Central Pyrenees—the highest part of the range—on August 1,  2000. In this false-color image, clouds appear white, snow appears pale  blue, vegetation appears green, and bare ground appears as either pink  or dark, bluish-purple. Water on the ground appears dark blue (or nearly  black). In this shot, the vegetated areas are mostly to the north, and  the peaks to the south are mostly bare rock. In the large image, patches  of dark purple that are visible along rivers and in valley floors are  probably developed areas.
As  mountain peaks rise higher, the land they support rises above the  treeline (the topmost elevation where trees can grow). At even higher  altitudes, hardly any plants can survive at all, so the highest mountain  peaks show just snow or bare rock. This mountain chain owes its  ruggedness to granite, a volcanic rock that erodes slowly. The mountains  also contain other rocks: gneiss and limestone. Glaciers didn’t act on  the Pyrenees as extensively as they did on the Alps, so these mountains  don’t sport big lakes left behind by glaciers. They do have water,  however, including many small lakes and waterfalls.

Central Pyrenees (NASA, ASTER, Terra, 08/01/00) (by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center)

The Alps may be more famous, but the Pyrenees have been around much longer: tens of millions of years longer, in fact. These mountains formed between 100 and 150 million years ago when the landmass that Spain occupies pushed into the one that France occupies. The mountains have served as a natural barrier between the Iberian Peninsula (Spain and Portugal) and the rest of Europe ever since. Stretching east to west across 430 square kilometers (267 miles), the Pyrenees fall mostly within Spain’s borders, but also pass into the independent state of Andorra.

The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA’s Terra satellite captured this image of part of the Central Pyrenees—the highest part of the range—on August 1, 2000. In this false-color image, clouds appear white, snow appears pale blue, vegetation appears green, and bare ground appears as either pink or dark, bluish-purple. Water on the ground appears dark blue (or nearly black). In this shot, the vegetated areas are mostly to the north, and the peaks to the south are mostly bare rock. In the large image, patches of dark purple that are visible along rivers and in valley floors are probably developed areas.

As mountain peaks rise higher, the land they support rises above the treeline (the topmost elevation where trees can grow). At even higher altitudes, hardly any plants can survive at all, so the highest mountain peaks show just snow or bare rock. This mountain chain owes its ruggedness to granite, a volcanic rock that erodes slowly. The mountains also contain other rocks: gneiss and limestone. Glaciers didn’t act on the Pyrenees as extensively as they did on the Alps, so these mountains don’t sport big lakes left behind by glaciers. They do have water, however, including many small lakes and waterfalls.

780px-Iceland_satellite (by ISLANDIA MORNING STAR)
St. Anthony Sand Dunes, Idaho (by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center)
Southwestern USA, Pacific Ocean (NASA, International Space Station Science, 09/09/10) (by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center)

More Telescopes / Less Bibles

Yesterday evening I came by chance on a forum that promotes the Flat Earth Theory. I could not believe that it was true, I thought it was a joke, no one can believe that the Earth is flat! Then i realized that there was not satirical intent in it. The Earth is flat. I want to report some of the belief that the forum proposes:


Q: “Why do you believe the Earth is flat?”
A:  It looks that way up close. In our local reference frame, it appears to take a flat shape, ignoring obvious hills and valleys. In addition, Samuel Rowbotham et al. performed a variety of experiments over a period of several years that show it must be flat. […]

The sun and moon, each 32 miles in diameter, rotate at a height of 3,000 miles above sea level. As they are spotlights, they only illuminate certain places. This explains why there are nights and days on Earth. The stars are at a height of 3,100 miles above sea level, which is as far as from San Francisco to Boston. […]

The Earth is not one of the other planets. The Earth is special and unlike the other bodies in numerous ways. […]

Since sustained spaceflight is not possible, satellites cannot orbit the Earth. The signals we supposedly receive from them are either broadcast from towers or any number of possible pseudolites. However, temporary space-flight is possible. […]

The forum is full of this stuff.

This morning, I came on a website called ‘Institute for Creation Research’. They say about theirself "Biblical, Accurate, Certain", and they support research to find evidence for Creation.

Now, I know you know this is only shit, but however, how is it possible that educated people today can believe that Earth is Flat, or that something con be Accurate and Certain because Biblical? And trust me, these are not things that have to do with Atheism or Believe in God. You can actually believe in God, but if you take a telescope and look at the sky you can’t say that "the sun and the moon are metallic discs".

In Italy (where I live) in the past weeks the Minister of Education proposes to insert the study of Bible in the public school.

Now, my advice is to buy more telescopes and less bibles.

Telescopes don’t make you believe the Earth is flat.


ASTER Maps Continued Pakistan Flooding (False Color) (by NASAJPL)
Our place in the Universe (by Alan)
Jupiter and Earth (by Lunar and Planetary Institute)