Scipsy

Breast cancer cells: a cluster of breast cancer cells showing visual evidence of programmed cell death (apoptosis) in yellow. (Credit Annie Cavanagh, Wellcome Images)

Breast cancer cells: a cluster of breast cancer cells showing visual evidence of programmed cell death (apoptosis) in yellow. (Credit Annie Cavanagh, Wellcome Images)

NASA Light Technology Successfully Reduces Cancer Patients Painful Side Effects from Radiation and Chemotherapy

A NASA technology originally developed for plant growth experiments on  space shuttle missions has successfully reduced the painful side effects  resulting from chemotherapy and radiation treatment in bone marrow and  stem cell transplant patients.   In a two-year clinical trial, cancer patients undergoing bone marrow or  stem cell transplants were given a far red/near infrared Light Emitting  Diode treatment called High Emissivity Aluminiferous Luminescent  Substrate, or HEALS, to treat oral mucositis — a common and extremely  painful side effect of chemotherapy and radiation treatment. The trial  concluded that there is a 96 percent chance that the improvement in pain  of those in the high-risk patient group was the result of the HEALS  treatment.   “Using this technology as a healing agent was phenomenal,” said Dr.  Donna Salzman, clinical trial principal investigator and director of  clinical services and education at the Bone Marrow Transplant and  Cellular Therapy Unit at the University of Alabama at Birmingham  Hospital. “The HEALS device was well tolerated with no adverse affects  to our bone marrow and stem cell transplant patients.” […]

NASA Light Technology Successfully Reduces Cancer Patients Painful Side Effects from Radiation and Chemotherapy

A NASA technology originally developed for plant growth experiments on space shuttle missions has successfully reduced the painful side effects resulting from chemotherapy and radiation treatment in bone marrow and stem cell transplant patients.

In a two-year clinical trial, cancer patients undergoing bone marrow or stem cell transplants were given a far red/near infrared Light Emitting Diode treatment called High Emissivity Aluminiferous Luminescent Substrate, or HEALS, to treat oral mucositis — a common and extremely painful side effect of chemotherapy and radiation treatment. The trial concluded that there is a 96 percent chance that the improvement in pain of those in the high-risk patient group was the result of the HEALS treatment.

“Using this technology as a healing agent was phenomenal,” said Dr. Donna Salzman, clinical trial principal investigator and director of clinical services and education at the Bone Marrow Transplant and Cellular Therapy Unit at the University of Alabama at Birmingham Hospital. “The HEALS device was well tolerated with no adverse affects to our bone marrow and stem cell transplant patients.” […]

The change in mammogram guidelines
[The image]: A cancer stem cell. (UCLA / December 5, 2007)

The change in mammogram guidelines

[The image]: A cancer stem cell. (UCLA / December 5, 2007)

MIT engineers have designed a new type of nanoparticle that could safely and effectively deliver vaccines for diseases such as HIV and malaria. […] Such particles could help scientists develop vaccines against cancer as well as infectious diseases. […]  (via Nano-sized vaccines)

MIT engineers have designed a new type of nanoparticle that could safely and effectively deliver vaccines for diseases such as HIV and malaria. […] Such particles could help scientists develop vaccines against cancer as well as infectious diseases. […] (via Nano-sized vaccines)

Aurianne Lescure, Curie Institute, France (by GE Healthcare)
Signal transduction in cancer.The aim is to follow the impact of perturbators on the endocytic pathway using the staining of 2 proteins Lamp1 and CD63.The image presented is the labelling of a normal RPE1 cell line, with DAPI in blue, Lamp1 in red and CD63 in green, acquired with the Incell 1000 and overlapped with photoshop.

Aurianne Lescure, Curie Institute, France (by GE Healthcare)

Signal transduction in cancer.
The aim is to follow the impact of perturbators on the endocytic pathway using the staining of 2 proteins Lamp1 and CD63.
The image presented is the labelling of a normal RPE1 cell line, with DAPI in blue, Lamp1 in red and CD63 in green, acquired with the Incell 1000 and overlapped with photoshop.

Carolin Zehetmeier, Morphosys AG, Germany (by GE Healthcare)
Breast Cancer Cells, Receptor Internalization, 40x Objective, Red: Nucleus Purple: Lysosome,Green: Receptor Turquoise: Actin filamentsCancer

Carolin Zehetmeier, Morphosys AG, Germany (by GE Healthcare)

Breast Cancer Cells, Receptor Internalization, 40x Objective, Red: Nucleus Purple: Lysosome,Green: Receptor Turquoise: Actin filaments
Cancer

Anne Martinez, CEA Grenoble/ iRTSV, France (by GE Healthcare)
HeLa cells treated with a compound which modifies tubulin (green) and destroys mitochondria (red). Stained for DNA (blue).Cancer

Anne Martinez, CEA Grenoble/ iRTSV, France (by GE Healthcare)

HeLa cells treated with a compound which modifies tubulin (green) and destroys mitochondria (red). Stained for DNA (blue).
Cancer

Anne Martinez, CEA Grenoble/ iRTSV, France (by GE Healthcare)
HeLa cells treated with a microtubule stabilizing drug, paclitaxel. Stained for DNA (blue), tubulin (green) and actin (red).Cance

Anne Martinez, CEA Grenoble/ iRTSV, France (by GE Healthcare)

HeLa cells treated with a microtubule stabilizing drug, paclitaxel. Stained for DNA (blue), tubulin (green) and actin (red).
Cance