Scipsy

Links Roundup #1

IMPOSSIBLE FIGURES, GRIEF≠DEPRESSION, MATH+CHILDREN, REVERSE ENGINEERING, NUMBER HYGIENE, SPACEWALK & SPACE MUSIC.

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When we admire the artwork of M.C. Escher, or we see some impossibile figure like the Pensore triange, how does the brain processe impossible objects?

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"The DSM-5 Mood Disorders Work Group has proposed eliminating in DSM-5 the major depression criterion E, “bereavement exclusion” (BE), which recognizes that depressive symptoms are sometimes normal in recently bereaved individuals.”

The failing in recognizing the difference between a proportionate response to a devastating emotional event and a mental illness carry the risk to make a caricature of psychiatry. Psychiatrists must think better.

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"Children as young as three to five years of age have the potential to learn mathematics that is surprisingly complex and sophisticated”, and, more impressive, infants by two months understand that unsupported objects will fall, and that hidden objects still exist and by five months of age they expect non-cohesive substances like water and sand to pour. This suggests that babies born with a basic understanding of how things in their environment operate.

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Ray Kurzweil is convinced that ”[…] by 2020 we’ll have computers that are powerful enough to simulate the human brain […] By 2029 […] we will have completed the reverse engineering of the human brain.”

Mh. I’m not sure.

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The Royal Statistical Society proposes 12 rules of “number hygiene” for journalists to at least achieve a basic understanding of numbers, statistics, graphs and so on (all of which are far too loved by journalists).

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"An EVA is probably the most physically demanding task an astronaut can undertake."How astronauts learn to “spacewalk”.

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The Sounds of Space.

"Musics in space is something very important for the moral of the crew and for the psychological support of the crew."

Cool t-shirts (‘I went to space and all I got was this lousy T-shirt’) and guitar songs. On ISS they are having even more fun than I expected.

Astronauts Young and Duke participate in training with Lunar Roving Vehicle, 1972 (via JSC Digital Image Collection)

Astronauts Young and Duke participate in training with Lunar Roving Vehicle, 1972 (via JSC Digital Image Collection)

EVA Изображение 18 из 105 (via Russian Federal Space Agency)

EVA Изображение 18 из 105 (via Russian Federal Space Agency)

Sunset Изображение 43 из 105 (via Russian Federal Space Agency)

Sunset Изображение 43 из 105 (via Russian Federal Space Agency)

a-a-a-bbcd replied to: Expedition 27 Landing…

Wow five months in space. How do they deal with muscle atrophy?

According to NASA:

"Astronauts on the International Space Station spend 2 1/2 hours per day exercising to combat the effects of muscle atrophy."

Expedition 27 Landing (201105240001HQ) (by nasa hq photo)

The Soyuz TMA-20 spacecraft is seen as it lands with Expedition 27  Commander Dmitry Kondratyev and Flight Engineers Paolo Nespoli and Cady  Coleman in a remote area southeast of the town of Zhezkazgan,  Kazakhstan, on Tuesday, May 24, 2011.   NASA Astronaut Coleman, Russian  Cosmonaut Kondratyev and Italian Astronaut Nespoli are returning from  more than five months onboard the International Space Station where they  served as members of the Expedition 26 and 27 crews.

Welcome back!

Expedition 27 Landing (201105240001HQ) (by nasa hq photo)

The Soyuz TMA-20 spacecraft is seen as it lands with Expedition 27 Commander Dmitry Kondratyev and Flight Engineers Paolo Nespoli and Cady Coleman in a remote area southeast of the town of Zhezkazgan, Kazakhstan, on Tuesday, May 24, 2011. NASA Astronaut Coleman, Russian Cosmonaut Kondratyev and Italian Astronaut Nespoli are returning from more than five months onboard the International Space Station where they served as members of the Expedition 26 and 27 crews.

Welcome back!


Astronaut Andrew Feustel reenters the space station after completing n 8-hour, 7-minute spacewalk at 10:12 a.m. EDT Sunday, May 22, 2011. He and fellow spacewalker Mike Fincke completed this, the second of the four STS-134 spacewalks, for a mission total of 14 hours 26 minutes. It was the 246th spacewalk conducted by U.S. astronauts, the 116th from space station airlocks, and the 157th in support of space station assembly and maintenance. It was Feustel’s fifth spacewalk and Fincke’s seventh spacewalk. (via NASA - Spacewalker)

Astronaut Andrew Feustel reenters the space station after completing n 8-hour, 7-minute spacewalk at 10:12 a.m. EDT Sunday, May 22, 2011. He and fellow spacewalker Mike Fincke completed this, the second of the four STS-134 spacewalks, for a mission total of 14 hours 26 minutes. It was the 246th spacewalk conducted by U.S. astronauts, the 116th from space station airlocks, and the 157th in support of space station assembly and maintenance. It was Feustel’s fifth spacewalk and Fincke’s seventh spacewalk. (via NASA - Spacewalker)

Anchored to a Canadarm2 mobile foot restraint, NASA astronaut Steve Bowen participates in the STS-133 mission’s second spacewalk as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 14-minute spacewalk, Bowen and fellow astronaut Alvin Drew tackled a variety of tasks, including venting into space some remaining ammonia from a failed pump module they moved during the mission’s first spacewalk. (via NASA - Anchored)

Anchored to a Canadarm2 mobile foot restraint, NASA astronaut Steve Bowen participates in the STS-133 mission’s second spacewalk as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 14-minute spacewalk, Bowen and fellow astronaut Alvin Drew tackled a variety of tasks, including venting into space some remaining ammonia from a failed pump module they moved during the mission’s first spacewalk. (via NASA - Anchored)

Clay’s “Pic of the Day!” An easy one for the Tweeps today! Enjoy your weekend! (via @Clayton C. Anderson)

Clay’s “Pic of the Day!” An easy one for the Tweeps today! Enjoy your weekend! (via @Clayton C. Anderson)