Scipsy

Florida Panther (via National Digital Library)

Florida Panther (via National Digital Library)

Greynurse Shark up close  (Photo by Richard Vevers; via Australian Museum)

Greynurse Shark up close  (Photo by Richard Vevers; via Australian Museum)

Sharks and gannets join the dolphins (via Telegraph)

Sharks and gannets join the dolphins (via Telegraph)

An Agamid lizard, Namibia, Africa (© Tom Tregenza; via  Centre for Bioscience ImageBank)

An Agamid lizard, Namibia, Africa (© Tom Tregenza; via  Centre for Bioscience ImageBank)

Sharks are awesome (via Discovery News)

Sharks are awesome (via Discovery News)

Spider Crab
Red Panda: Just like giant pandas, these pandas primarily eat bamboo and live in temperate forests in China, as well as Myanmar and other south Asian countries. (via Asian Animals Photo Gallery)

Red Panda: Just like giant pandas, these pandas primarily eat bamboo and live in temperate forests in China, as well as Myanmar and other south Asian countries. (via Asian Animals Photo Gallery)

On Scientific American’s blog there is an article telling about a tragic anecdotes:

"A  female gazelle having suddenly died from something it had eaten, the  male stood over the dead body of his mate, butting every one who  attempted to touch it, then, suddenly making a spring, struck his head  against a wall and fell dead at the side of his companion."

The post suggest to possible explanation:
1.  the male gazelle also ate the same thing that killed the female and it  caused neurological damages that made him harmful to himself (and  others).
2. The gazelle’s action seems similar what is known as  “stotting” (jumping in the air with all four legs simultaneously off the  ground, like in the photo above) that gazelles do when scared by a predator. In this case, maybe  the gazelle perceived humans as predators.
But, just like the author of the post, I’m curious if there is some evidence that some animals commits suicide.
Have you ever heard something about suicidal animals? And if so, is the suicide in animals comparable and the one in humans?

On Scientific American’s blog there is an article telling about a tragic anecdotes:

"A female gazelle having suddenly died from something it had eaten, the male stood over the dead body of his mate, butting every one who attempted to touch it, then, suddenly making a spring, struck his head against a wall and fell dead at the side of his companion."

The post suggest to possible explanation:

1. the male gazelle also ate the same thing that killed the female and it caused neurological damages that made him harmful to himself (and others).

2. The gazelle’s action seems similar what is known as “stotting” (jumping in the air with all four legs simultaneously off the ground, like in the photo above) that gazelles do when scared by a predator. In this case, maybe the gazelle perceived humans as predators.

But, just like the author of the post, I’m curious if there is some evidence that some animals commits suicide.

Have you ever heard something about suicidal animals? And if so, is the suicide in animals comparable and the one in humans?

Large walrus on the ice - Odobenus rosmarus divergens - contemplating the photographer. (Phot by: Captain Budd Christman; via NOAA)

Large walrus on the ice - Odobenus rosmarus divergens - contemplating the photographer. (Phot by: Captain Budd Christman; via NOAA)


Skunks are legendary for their powerful predator-deterrent—a hard-to-remove, horrible-smelling spray. A skunk’s spray is an oily liquid produced by glands under its large tail. To employ this scent bomb, a skunk turns around and blasts its foe with a foul mist that can travel as far as ten feet (three meters). Skunk spray causes no real damage to its victims, but it sure makes them uncomfortable. It can linger for many days and defy attempts to remove it. As a defensive technique, the spray is very effective. Predators typically give skunks a wide berth unless little other food is available. There are many different kinds of skunks. They vary in size (most are house cat-sized) and appear in a variety of striped, spotted, and swirled patterns—but all are a vivid black-and-white that makes them easily identifiable and may alert predators to their pungent potential. Skunks usually nest in burrows constructed by other animals, but they also live in hollow logs or even abandoned buildings. In colder climates, some skunks may sleep in these nests for several weeks of the chilliest season. Each female gives birth to between two and ten young each year. Skunks are opportunistic eaters with a varied diet. They are nocturnal foragers who eat fruit and plants, insects, larvae, worms, eggs, reptiles, small mammals, and even fish. Nearly all skunks live in the Americas, except for the Asian stink badgers that have recently been added to the skunk family. (Photograph by Gordon and Cathy Illg/Animals Animals—Earth Scenes; via National Geographic)

Skunks are legendary for their powerful predator-deterrent—a hard-to-remove, horrible-smelling spray. A skunk’s spray is an oily liquid produced by glands under its large tail. To employ this scent bomb, a skunk turns around and blasts its foe with a foul mist that can travel as far as ten feet (three meters). Skunk spray causes no real damage to its victims, but it sure makes them uncomfortable. It can linger for many days and defy attempts to remove it. As a defensive technique, the spray is very effective. Predators typically give skunks a wide berth unless little other food is available. There are many different kinds of skunks. They vary in size (most are house cat-sized) and appear in a variety of striped, spotted, and swirled patterns—but all are a vivid black-and-white that makes them easily identifiable and may alert predators to their pungent potential. Skunks usually nest in burrows constructed by other animals, but they also live in hollow logs or even abandoned buildings. In colder climates, some skunks may sleep in these nests for several weeks of the chilliest season. Each female gives birth to between two and ten young each year. Skunks are opportunistic eaters with a varied diet. They are nocturnal foragers who eat fruit and plants, insects, larvae, worms, eggs, reptiles, small mammals, and even fish. Nearly all skunks live in the Americas, except for the Asian stink badgers that have recently been added to the skunk family. (Photograph by Gordon and Cathy Illg/Animals Animals—Earth Scenes; via National Geographic)