Scipsy

Apr 05

psydoctor8 said: you are missed. that is all.

Although this break from tumblr have had some positive effects on me (I’ve stopped from compulsively sifting through the NASA’s archive like a maniac and I no longer fell the need to stay up all night trying to answer the most absurd questions) I have to admit that I miss all this sciency stuff and I miss a lot the awesome people I’ve known through this silly blog.

Sep 25

In the last months this blog has experienced a progressive decline in the number of produced posts. There are several reasons that come to my mind to explain why is that, but probably the better one is about the fact that I lost motivation. Unexpectedly, despite the lack of regular updates the blog gained more and more followers. [That’s flattering, but at the same time makes me suspicious about the relationship between quality of a blog and number of followers.] 

Anyway, I always feel a little lost when I follow a blog and it slowly fades away, and then it just stops posting, without saying anything, so I thought to make this post.

I’m not going to update scipsy anymore. This could change, but for now I don’t feel like posting here anymore. I’m not going to delete it.

If someone would like to stay in touch, just send a message or something. This is my mail: dr.scipsy@gmail.com

If someone is wondering: “Who will fill my dash with science now?" here’s a list of sciency tumblr I followed:

That’s it, I think.

So long, and thanks for all the fish.

Sep 15

Galaxy pair called Arp 116, composed of a giant elliptical galaxy Messier 60, and a smaller spiral galaxy, NGC 4647. (via ESA/Hubble)

Galaxy pair called Arp 116, composed of a giant elliptical galaxy Messier 60, and a smaller spiral galaxy, NGC 4647. (via ESA/Hubble)

Sep 12

This composite image shows a superbubble in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), a small satellite galaxy of the Milky Way, located about 160,000 light years from Earth. Many new stars, some of them very massive, are forming in the star cluster NGC 1929, which is embedded in the nebula N44. The massive stars produce intense radiation, expel matter at high speeds, and race through their evolution to explode as supernovas. The winds and supernova shock waves carve out huge cavities called superbubbles in the surrounding gas. (via CHANDRA)

This composite image shows a superbubble in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), a small satellite galaxy of the Milky Way, located about 160,000 light years from Earth. Many new stars, some of them very massive, are forming in the star cluster NGC 1929, which is embedded in the nebula N44. The massive stars produce intense radiation, expel matter at high speeds, and race through their evolution to explode as supernovas. The winds and supernova shock waves carve out huge cavities called superbubbles in the surrounding gas. (via CHANDRA)

Sep 03

Globular cluster M4 (via ESA/Hubble)

Globular cluster M4 (via ESA/Hubble)

Aug 30

“[…] the way drugs are often portrayed as nothing but harmful and damaging is quite disconcerting; it suggests that taking drugs is akin to trying to increase the speed of your computer by pouring coffee over the motherboard; you’re going to experience a lot of new sights, sounds and smells, but cause irreversible damage in the process. That’s not how it works. Many drugs are effective because they work on systems in the brain that are already there. Opiates like heroin work on opiate receptors, cocaine affects the dopamine system (amongst others). The brain and body have evolved over millions of years to recognise and utilise these chemicals, and drugs typically work because they are analogous to the substances that occur naturally in our bodies. E.g. cannabis works because the brain has endogenous cannabinoids.” — Dean Burnett on the recent study that states that cannabis use is linked to reduced IQ.

Spiral Galaxy NGC 1512

Spiral Galaxy NGC 1512

Aug 28

Some Thoughts about Schizoid Dynamics by Nancy McWilliams. [pdf] -

Recently I see more and more posts about introversion, how introvert people really are, how to interact with them and so on. I’ve seen dozen of those posts. I’ve read a couple of posts about ‘highly sensitive people' (HSP) too. Apparently people like those posts. That’s ok. I understand that. People who identify themseles as introvert are pleased to know that there are others like them, that the way they are is just a normal variation within the human population. That makes them feel less alone and more “normal”. 

I don’t think that finding a label for one’s own quirks of personality is useful, but that’s me. I don’t think I’m introvert or HSP, although many people have said that to me. 

I don’t talk much, that’s true. I’m not easy to talk to, that’s also true. Some people find that unconfortable. I understand that. Just yesterday I had a very awful experience because of my not-talking-much thing.

Today I was searching for articles and I found this one. It’s by one of my favorite psychotherapists and it’s about something others could call introversion. Nancy McWilliams prefer to use the term “schizoid personality”. I personally don’t like the term introversion, mostly because it implies that there are only two ways you could be: you’re an introvert, or an extrovert. I don’t think it is like that. I’m not sure “schizoid personality” is the right term either, but I understand why McWilliams has chosen it.

I thought I’d share this article because I felt it’s not shallow like other I’ve read, and because I felt it as more humane.

Infrared View of the Milky Way Center

Infrared View of the Milky Way Center

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